Any historic landmark takes a lot of work to upkeep. Despite being an international destination spot for its beautiful nature and weather, the San Francisco Bay Area also has many historical buildings that play an integral part of the West Coast’s story.

Even though the Bay Area has evolved so much over the last couple of decades doesn’t mean the rich history has disappeared. These are the 4 benefits to preserving historical buildings of the San Francisco Bay Area.

  1.  Older buildings can be just as sustainable as anything newly built. It makes more sense to upkeep a building and improve what already exists than to demolish for something new. Instead of using resources and energy to create something new, restore and rehabilitate what needs improvement!

  2. There is an increase in commercial value due to the higher quality materials used for these buildings to withstand the test of time!

  3.  Historical buildings retain the history of the city. They add to the Bay Area’s identity and heritage by paying homage to the past. Can you picture San Francisco without the Transamerica Pyramid, Coit Tower, or the Embarcadero piers?

  4. Beauty is on the outside as well as the inside in this case. By applying new features in a historical building, you add on to its story.  Take, for example, 140 New Montgomery building:

Preservation Success Story: 140 New Montgomery (AKA Yelp!’s Home)

Nowadays, we read about dazzling all new glass buildings that sweep everyone off their feet with incredible amenities and sustainability features. However, 140 New Montgomery proves that just because it’s been around since 1925 doesn’t mean it can’t compete against the new flashy buildings in town. The former PacBell Building is even expected to gain a gold LEED certification this year for their restoration improvements! Maybe the secret is treating the building like a business because a business always adapts to improve.

After 85 years of wear and tear, 140 New Montgomery’s terra cotta and windows received a facelift with new windows providing the building with ample lighting!

Their lobby holds a delicately painted and intact ceiling of Chinese motifs. They have replaced the lights to create a new effect for the lobby and highlight the also revised elevator and entry desk. It may gain another point in the LEED system for promoting the use of their central staircase from the restored windows.

The steps 140 New Montgomery took to becoming a stellar example of adaptation comes from focusing on maintenance: to repair what needs fixing and to highlight the property’s original character.

Learn more about 140 New Montgomery’s story and discover renovation photos here!

Check out our blogs on LinkedIn!

We’re on Instagram! Witness all the beauty that Bay Area buildings have to offer through our photos!

 

Subscribe to our mailing list for announcements and specials!

* indicates required